Chart Out Your Route

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    If one notices, a majority of road accidents occur either due to speeding or the drivers changing their mind – and lane – at the last minute, thus irritating and confusing the law-abiding road-users.

    Barring exceptions, when one starts the car and takes it out of his garage or parking space, one knows where he is heading for and is [or should be] clear about the route he has to take, including the detours one may have to make to do things on the way.

    And if that is indeed the case then one also bears in mind which road to hit, and which lane to stick to, and when and where to take turns. As we drive along we know our route chart.

    Therefore it often comes as a surprise when people are seen suddenly wanting to change the lane, and if denied or rebuffed in their attempt, tend to force their way into the new lane and eventually cause an accident if the battle of wills persists.

    The worse offenders are the ones who seem to be in a tearing hurry as if the rest of the world is happy crawling along, and decide – even though they are in the through lane which is showing green signal – to turn left on reaching the traffic light where the left turn may still show the red light.

    Not to be outdone, they then decide to stop in the through lane even though it is showing green and those behind him are blaring their horns, and tend to salve their conscience by putting their left indicator on as if to make up for their misdemeanour, until the left-turn light also turns green.

    There are also those who would be driving happily in, say, Lane 1 on a four-lane highway
    when all of a sudden they can be noticed pushing their way, cutting diagonally, trying to reach
    Lane 4. Why? Because the lay-by of Lane 4 will
    take them to right and the realms beyond. But where was he heading on the road to China when his destination was Timbuctoo? Or was he out eating the air?

    The point is that the roads today, as opposed
    to 20 years ago, are quite busy and there is little room to indulge in the habit of taking sudden decisions or changing one’s mind in the middle of driving. That only causes confusion, anger, frustration – and sometimes panic – among the fellow road-users.